Pan Head Phillips Sheet Metal Screws Zinc Plated

A thread forming tapping screw with spaced threads and a gimlet point.

 

Allied Bolt and Screw Corporation, a Small Business incorporated in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts by Richard ‘Dick’ Goldberg, has been building strong relationships since 1961 with an expansive quality inventory, exceptional service and highly valued customer appreciation. Allied stocks  Zinc Plated Pan Head Phillips Sheet Metal Screws and thousands of other products. Contact Us for more information.

Allied Bolt & Screw carries Residential Solar Panel Hardware including the following:

SOLAR PANEL ROOF HOOKS

SOLAR PANEL FLASHED L-FOOT AND FLASHING

SOLAR PANEL INSTALLATION SCREWS

SOLAR PANEL INSTALLATION SCREW DRIVERS

QUICKBOLTS ® , WASHER, and DRIVER

SOLAR PANEL RACK FASTENERS

SOLAR PANEL ROOF RACK T-BOLT and FLANGE NUT

Allied Bolt and Screw Corporation, a Small Business incorporated in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts by Richard ‘Dick’ Goldberg, has been building strong relationships since 1961 with an expansive quality inventory, exceptional service and highly valued customer appreciation. Allied stocks solar panel hardware and thousands of other products. Contact Us for more information.

FASTAP TECH 7 Stainless Steel Self-Drilling Carpentry Screws, manufactured from 18-8 stainless steel, have the patented Power Point self-drilling point design, a coarse thread, longer unthreaded shanks for tighter draw down, and a unique larger self-countersinking square drive flat head with large nibs.

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Allied Bolt and Screw Corporation, a Small Business incorporated in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts by Richard ‘Dick’ Goldberg, has been building strong relationships since 1961 with an expansive quality inventory, exceptional service and highly valued customer appreciation. Allied has the largest selection of Fastap Tech 7 Stainless Steel Self-Drilling Carpentry Screws And More. Contact Us for more information.


 

Nylon fasteners are non-corrosive, vibration resistant and anti-magnetic. They are often used in hospitals, electrical fields, the chemical industry, oil refineries, food processing and more.

Nylon fasteners have several head configurations such as Hex Head, Slotted Head, Phillips Head and Socket Head.

Nylon is a tough material that is difficult to tear and exhibits excellent abrasion resistance. It can bend and will bounce back. It is not damaged by oils, solvents or alcohols. However, when exposed to acids such as dilute sulfuric acid it will begin to break down. The material will also be damaged if it comes into contact with phenols, alkalis, and iodine. It is a hygroscopic material and on the molecular level tends to absorb moisture from the surrounding environment. Water molecules bond with the amide groups in the nylon molecules and cause the material to swell. At the same time, nylon tends not to absorb water droplets from minor splashing, making it dry to the touch. Nylon will decompose under sunlight. Nylon is not affected by fungi, molds and mildew.

Nylon is used for for making plastic machine parts as it is low cost and long lasting. It is often commonly used in the electronics industry for its non-conductivity and heat resistance. It is used for screws, bolts, washers and nuts as well as Circuit board hardware. Parts made of nylon are often used in mechanisms that rotate or slide due its low coefficient of friction. It is used to make bearings for the appliance industry because of its excellent abrasion resistance.

Nylon is used in cookware since it has a relatively high continuous service temperature. These include spatulas, slotted spoons, turners, forks, tongs, brushes, and more. Nylon is easy to dye. Nylon cookware can be color co-ordinated with kitchen decor. Nylon cooking tools are gentle on non-stick surfaces. Nylon will not burn, but will melt.

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Allied Bolt and Screw Corporation, a Small Business incorporated in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts by Richard ‘Dick’ Goldberg, has been building strong relationships since 1961 with an expansive quality inventory, exceptional service and highly valued customer appreciation. Allied has the largest selection of Nylon Bolts, Nylon Screws, Nylon Nuts, Nylon Washers, Nylon Screw Covers And More. Contact Us for more information.


 

Allied stocks the largest selection of sink clips and hardware anywhere!

VIEW ALL SINK CLIPS and HARDWARE »


About Allied Bolt & Screw

Allied Bolt and Screw Corporation, a Small Business incorporated in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts by Richard ‘Dick’ Goldberg, has been building strong relationships since 1961 with an expansive quality inventory, exceptional service and highly valued customer appreciation. Allied stocks the largest selection of sink clips and hardware anywhere! Contact Us for more information.


 

The POWER-SertAdhesive Insert Anchor is a proprietary internally threaded insert designed for use with structural adhesive.

The unique undercut design requires less adhesive and a shallow embedment while providing superior holding values in a variety of materials.

The exclusive FRICTION-FIT™ locks adhesive in place and allows immediate fastening of the fixture during cure time.

The POWER-SertAdhesive Insert Anchor is the ultimate problem solver!

It is machine lathed from a single piece of steel or stainless steel – no weak points, and the unique undercut design with knurling provides superior holding values.

There are no special tools required, allowing for easy installation. There is no need to move equipment or fixtures to be fastened. It is ideal for in-place use.

The POWER-SertAdhesive Insert Anchor allows for close edge distance and spacing.

It’s shallow embedment helps avoid rebar and drill-through, while the adhesive bond and shallow embedment minimize any effects of cone failure.

The POWER-SertAdhesive Insert Anchor is vibration-resistant, as the adhesive bond withstands more seismic vibration loading than most standard mechanical anchors.

Typical applications include the installation of car lifts, pallet racks, guard rails, machine anchoring, marine and bridge work in normal weight concrete, light weight concrete and solid masonry.

Buy WEJ-IT® POWER-Sert™ Adhesive Insert Anchors

Allied Bolt and Screw Corporation, a Small Business incorporated in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts by Richard ‘Dick’ Goldberg, has been building strong relationships since 1961 with an expansive quality inventory, exceptional service and highly valued customer appreciation. Allied stocks WEJ-IT® POWER-Sert™ Adhesive Insert Anchors. as well as 10s of thousands of other products.   Contact Us for more information.

Anchor Bolt Hot Galvanized

Foundation anchor bolts are used in the building, construction, and repair of wood and metal structures, such as building columns, posts, street lighting, traffic signals, highway signs, porch and deck supports and much more in concrete and footings.

We stock over 5,000 in over 50 sizes of Hot Galvanized Anchor Bolts (A36).

We’re also BIG on F1554 Grades 36, 55 and 105 in both plain steel and hot galvanized as ‘special orders’.

Click here for stock sizes and pricing.


About Allied Bolt & Screw

Since 1961 we have been the top provider of Hot Galvanized Anchor Bolts, Rods, Studs, Nuts, Washers, screws and 1000s of products. Allied Bolt & Screw can fulfill any building and manufacturing need. Contact Us for more information.


 

Bridging Construction’s Talent Gap with Learning Workers

Reprinted from Constructor

The construction industry faces a growing workforce shortage and talent gap that could impact productivity and workflow by 2020. Construction is now commonly cited as one of the hardest industries to recruit and retain talent, especially when it comes to finding skilled laborers and project leaders.

The way the construction industry has been taught to work and the way we’ve trained our workers are perfectly suited for a future world that no longer exists. Construction must shift from traditional knowledge workers to a new generation of learning workers. Knowledge workers are given specific information and skillsets and are expected to apply, grow and refine that knowledge over the course of their career. In contrast, learning workers are taught how to continually learn and apply new skills, adapting to changing work requirements as they arise.

The shift from knowledge workers to learning workers is already underway. We will always need skilled workers and laborers to construct our buildings, but their skillsets will change over time. Three key milestones will accelerate the transition:

• By 2025, augmented reality (AR) and virtual reality (VR) will emerge as standard on-the-job training tools, providing a platform for workers to gain new knowledge and skills at the jobsite.

• By 2030, highly skilled veteran workers will move from the field to central, remote operations. These veteran workers will train and lead new, generalist workers virtually through AR/VR and other technology platforms.

• By 2035, the transition to learning workers will be complete. Instead of having developed skillsets, workers will learn skills as they go, adapting and applying their learning to new situations and issues as they arise.
THE RISE OF AR/VR

AR/VR delivers an ideal platform for field-based workforce training and collaboration. It’s clear to see why AR/VR vendors are targeting built environment applications and why construction companies are clamoring to evaluate and adopt the latest AR/VR technologies.

Dozens of pilot projects are in place to create completely immersive construction sites where veteran workers can walk side-by-side with their less-trained counterparts in a virtual version of the building. Specific tasks, equipment and skills can be outlined in an interactive, 360-degree virtual world, allowing trainers to map out each project phase. Specifications, schematics and even training videos can be overlaid to provide a training experience unlike no other.

Several vendors are taking these concepts even further, merging AR displays within hard hats and safety glasses to create enhanced, heads-up displays. The technology can flag safety issues, unfinished work and more. The technology can even lay out a virtual project template that workers can follow as they go, streamlining workflow dramatically.

The next generation of construction workers needs to master the art of learning quickly, adapting that practice in an ever-changing work environment.

AR/VR offers solutions to help combat construction’s workforce and talent gap. Adoption is still in its infancy but will quicken as technology vendors improve their offerings. By 2025, AR/VR will be ubiquitous within the industry, becoming a standard on-the-job training tool. It will also provide a platform to centralize well-trained workers for remote training and operations.

CENTRALIZING THE WELL-TRAINED WORKFORCE

Construction is currently based on multiple highly specialized and well-trained trades. Unfortunately, many of those tradespeople are retiring without an adequate workforce in place to accept the passing baton. What happens when there are not enough of these veteran workers to go around?

Training programs cannot realistically transfer a lifetime of on-the-job, specialized training to new workers entering the field. And there simply are not enough mid-career veterans to fill the growing need. The value of highly specialized and well-trained tradespeople is about to rise dramatically — so much so that construction companies will be forced to create new models to retain those workers longer and get as much knowledge and experience out of them as possible.

The construction industry must embrace “in the moment” training. Veteran, well-trained workers will move from field work to a central remote operations and training role (prolonging their ability to stay on the job). These veteran workers will connect with junior, generalist workers in the field, walking them through specialized steps and processed via AR/VR and other technology platforms.

In a recent project, a senior engineer leveraged AR technology to commission a wireless network in a newly built structure while training a junior engineer new to the industry. The senior engineer that designed the system was based in Seattle, while the building and junior engineers were both located in Denver. Schedules and budgets didn’t allow for extensive travel back and forth. AR offered a workaround. The junior engineer donned a pair of AR glasses on the physical jobsite. Sitting in his office in Seattle, the senior engineer was able to see exactly what the junior engineer saw, walking him through the building and calling out what equipment to look for, what tests to run and what changes to make. The project was completed flawlessly, on time and on budget, thanks to the flexibility provided by emerging AR technologies. What’s more, the entire session was recorded, offering a training file for the junior engineer to study and leverage in future work.

This is the first step in creating a more centralized workforce. By 2030, highly skilled workers will move from the field to central, remote operations to train and lead generalist workers virtually.

Technology is advancing rapidly. The rate of change is so quick that the ability to gain new knowledge will soon be more valuable than the knowledge itself. The next generation of construction workers needs to master the art of learning quickly, adapting that practice in an ever-changing work environment. New technologies and innovations are being introduced on — what seems like — a weekly basis. Modern construction sites are deploying drones, automated bricklayers, 3D printers, RFID sensors and a host of mobile and IoT devices. The industry needs to partner with universities, community colleges, unions and other training and apprenticeship programs to rethink current linear curricula to ensure the workforce can
keep pace.

Janice Clusserath is director of human resources for McKinstry, a national leader in designing, constructing, operating and maintaining high-performing buildings. From new construction and ongoing operations to adaptive reuse and energy retrofits, the company provides a single point of accountability across the entire building lifecycle. Learn more at
www.McKinstry.com.


About Allied Bolt & Screw

Since 1961 we have been the top provider of Hot Galvanized Anchor Bolts, Rods, Studs, Nuts, Washers, screws and 1000s of products. Allied Bolt & Screw can fulfill any building and manufacturing need. Contact Us for more information.


 

ASTM F1554 Grade 105 Threaded Rods and Anchor Bolts are manufactured from medium carbon alloy steel that has been quenched and tempered (heat treated) to develop the desired mechanical values. This is the highest strength version of the F1554 specification, with a minimum yield strength of 105 ksi, covering anchor bolts in diameters ranging from 1/2″ through 3″.

F1554 Grade 105 Threaded Rods and Anchor Bolts can be galvanized even though they are relatively high in strength. The galvanizing does not affect the mechanical properties of the anchor bolt and will not cause hydrogen embrittlement.

F1554 Grade 105 Threaded Rods and Anchor Bolts should not be welded. Since they develop their strength characteristics through a heat treating process, applying heat (welding) in an uncontrolled environment could change the mechanical properties of the anchor bolt. The American Institute of Steel Construction Manual states “Anchor bolt material that is quenched and tempered (heat treated) should not be welded or heated.”

F1554 Grade 105 Threaded Rods and Anchor Bolts have a tensile strength of 125-150 ksi and a yield strength of 105 ksi minimum.

BUY ASTM F1554 Grade 105 Threaded Rods and Anchor Bolts

Allied Bolt and Screw Corporation, located at 1020 Turnpike Street in Canton, Massachusetts stocks F1554 Grade 105 Threaded Rods in 6 foot lengths up to 1-3/8” diameter, although other diameters and lengths are available. Allied Bolt and Screw Corporation, a Small Business incorporated in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts by Richard ‘Dick’ Goldberg, has been building strong relationships since 1961 with an expansive quality inventory, exceptional service and highly valued customer appreciation. Allied stocks ASTM F1554 Grade 105 Threaded Rods and Anchor Bolts as well as 10s of thousands of other products.   Contact Us for more information.

MA. leads way with women in union construction

Reprinted from Boston Business Journal

If you were near TD Garden last fall and looked up about 200 feet, there’s a good chance you saw Heather Daly. She operated the crane above The Hub on Causeway.

Heather Daly, Operating Engineers Local 4

Heather Daly, Operating Engineers Local 4

Heather traded her low-paying office job for the chance to build the city’s skyline and a meaningful career in the union building trades. And while her story is remarkable, it isn’t unique.

Thanks to major union-backed initiatives like Build a Life MA, a growing number of women across the commonwealth are helping to drive the region’s building boom. And our efforts are paying off: 93.5 percent of women in construction are getting their start through union-run apprenticeship programs, where they can continue to earn a salary while learning a new trade.

The union building trades also provide a pathway to a rewarding career, with industry-leading wages and benefits, free training and skills development, the highest safety standards, and opportunities for advancement.

That’s a big reason why when it comes to women working in the trades, Massachusetts is leading the nation.

In Massachusetts, the percentage of women in union apprenticeship programs is almost triple the national average of women in the construction workforce.

For Heather Daly, having a great, middle-class job with the International Union of Operating Engineers Local 4 has allowed her to buy a home, and to send her daughter to college. It’s also meant finally having the peace of mind that comes with a stable, rewarding career.

Thanks to stories like Heather’s, the word is getting out and women are beginning to think about the union trades as an attractive option. Women become construction workers for the same reasons that men do. The union construction trades pay very well, between $60,000 to $100,000 a year, and provide excellent family-sustaining benefits including health care and a dignified retirement.

Some women may hesitate to consider the union trades as a career as they may feel they lack the experience. Previous experience is great, but it’s not required. Our programs are specifically designed to train industry newcomers to become skilled craftspeople. Learning is done both on the job and through classroom training.

Over the last couple of years, Massachusetts has seen a 107 percent increase in the number of female apprenticeships. Expanding opportunities isn’t just the right thing to do morally — it’s a smart business model. Massachusetts’ building trades and construction contractors have recognized that that there is a tight labor market with an estimated need for more than 43,000 new construction workers. The solution is training and employment for those who have been historically underrepresented, and those who need these good careers now. Industry leaders know that providing a diverse skilled workforce helps grow their market share. The number of tradeswomen across the state has tripled since 2012 and we should be proud of this as it’s a sign of progress. And we’ll continue to create pathways of opportunity so more women like Heather join our ranks.