Video: Allied Bolt's President Neil Goldberg Discusses Their Screw Inventory

Allied Bolt has a variety of screws to meet the demand from their customers. Pan Head, Flat Head, Oval Head, Hex Head Cap Screws and more!

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Allied Bolt and Screw Corporation, a Small Business incorporated in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts by Richard ‘Dick’ Goldberg, has been building strong relationships since 1961 with an expansive quality inventory, exceptional service and highly valued customer appreciation. Allied stocks Pan Head, Flat Head, Oval Head, Hex Head Cap Screws and more plus thousands other products. Contact Us for more information.

Boston Construction News: First Look at Amazon's Newest Building in Boston's Seaport

Reprinted from  NBC 10

The design got rave reviews from the city’s architectural commission

The team developing the newest Seaport office for web and e-commerce giant Amazon.com Inc. pitched the building’s design to the city’s volunteer architectural commission this week. It got rave reviews.

WS Development’s Yanni Tsipis and Michael Sørenson from Copenhagen-based architecture firm Henning Larsen presented a 17-story office at 1 Boston Wharf Road, where Amazon has committed to lease 630,000 square feet of office space, to the Boston Civic Design Commission Tuesday evening.

Sørenson, a partner with Henning Larsen and design director of the firm’s New York office, said the building’s location on the edge of the historic Fort Point neighborhood and newly developed Seaport District is an important transition point.

 

Video- ‘AUTOMOTIVE-SPECIFIC’ REPAIR ASSORTMENTS

Designed specifically for the repair and restoration of: HYUNDAI, GM, FORD, CHRYSLER, TOYOTA, NISSAN, HONDA, MERCEDES, SUBARU & BMW.

Please watch the video on our automotive department and our holiday video as well!

Holiday Video

Automotive Assortments, Retainers, Clips, Grommets, Rivets, Screws, Nuts and Washers

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Allied Bolt and Screw Corporation, a Small Business incorporated in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts by Richard ‘Dick’ Goldberg, has been building strong relationships since 1961 with an expansive quality inventory, exceptional service and highly valued customer appreciation. Allied stocks ‘AUTOMOTIVE-SPECIFIC’ REPAIR ASSORTMENTS and thousands other products. Contact Us for more information.

Product Spotlight- Stainless Steel Fasteners

Allied Bolt and Screw carries one of the largest inventories of STAINLESS STEEL FASTENERS in the industry including BOLTS, NUTS, WASHERS, RODS, SCREWS and ANCHORS.   These categories consist of one of the diverse lines of HEX, CARRIAGE and LAG BOLTS, MACHINE, SHEET METAL and SELF-DRILLING SCREWS, WEDGE, SLEEVE and DROP-IN ANCHORS and much more.

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About Allied Bolt & Screw

Allied Bolt and Screw Corporation, a Small Business incorporated in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts by Richard ‘Dick’ Goldberg, has been building strong relationships since 1961 with an expansive quality inventory, exceptional service and highly valued customer appreciation. Allied stocks the largest selection of STAINLESS STEEL FASTENERS and thousands of other products. Contact Us for more information.


 

Massachusetts Construction News: Baker signs $626 million economic development bill

Reprinted from  Commonwealth Magazine

New law includes long-sought zoning reform. Gov. Charlie Baker on Thursday signed a $626 million economic development bond bill, which will provide money for a variety of COVID-19 relief funds as well as other state projects.

The bill also includes significant zoning reform, which Baker had been lobbying to enact for years, which is expected to increase housing production in Massachusetts. The governor vetoed several sections of the bill, including some aimed at providing additional protection for tenants and low-income homeowners.

“This legislation will drive economic growth and improve housing stability, neighborhood stabilization and transit–oriented development,” Baker said in a statement. Baker said the bill “will go far to support the Commonwealth’s small businesses, workers, and communities as we recover from the impacts of COVID-19.”

The core of the bill is its spending authorizations, which fund both normal capital projects and COVID-19-related spending. There are large sums dedicated to broadband internet, site development for construction projects, manufacturing-related partnerships, and scientific research and development. The bill also includes COVID-19-related grants to restaurants, small businesses, and cultural facilities.

Sen. Eric Lesser, a Longmeadow Democrat who was the Senate’s lead negotiator on the bill, said in a recent interview that much of the spending requires state agencies to consider equity –– social, racial, and geographic –– in awarding grants. “The totality of the package is really about rebuilding and recovering from the COVID-19 recession in a more sustainable and equitable way,” Lesser said.

Baker, in a letter to lawmakers that accompanied his actions on the bill, stressed the funding for neighborhood stabilization, transit-oriented development, and revitalization of blighted properties, as well as money for microbusinesses and grants to help women– and minority-owned businesses.

Baker did note, however, that the spending bill is the first step in authorizing money, and the bill is larger than what the state had budgeted for economic development. The final decision about how much money to actually appropriate will be up to the Baker administration – so it is possible that not all the projects laid out in the bill will ultimately be funded.

In addition to the spending provisions, the bill included several policy proposals, the most significant of which was Baker’s Housing Choice initiative. The bill would lower the voting threshold for municipal government from two-thirds to a simple majority for certain zoning changes that the state wants to incentivize. The goal is to lessen the state’s housing crunch by making it easier to build more housing, and particularly more dense developments in appropriate places. Baker has frequently warned that the high price of housing will drive more people out of state if it is not addressed, since workers will not be able to afford to live here.

The bill would have pushed the implementation date off by 90 days, but Baker vetoed that section. “Housing Choice is the first significant zoning reform in decades,” Baker said. “Cities and towns should be able to take advantage of the revised voting thresholds immediately.”

One criticism of the initial version of Baker’s bill is that it did not do enough to build new affordable housing and did nothing to help renters. Legislators, in the final bill, included several provisions to address these concerns. One, which Baker signed, would require communities served by the MBTA to designate one reasonably sized district near a T station in which multi-family building is allowed by right.

While the Massachusetts Municipal Association expressed concern that this would override local control, Lesser said it is only fair that communities that benefit from the MBTA give back by providing much-needed housing. “Communities benefit greatly from the connectivity the T offers,” Lesser said. “It anchors and increases their property values significantly. In return for that, they need to do their part in allowing some denser development where appropriate.”

However, Baker vetoed several other housing-related provisions that were meant to benefit renters or low-income individuals. The bill would have modified a tax credit program for housing developers in Gateway Cities to add a requirement that they construct affordable housing. Baker vetoed the change saying it “will make these projects more difficult to finance and add a layer of complexity that is not consistent with the program’s goals.”

The bill would have created a local option in which municipalities would give tenants the first option to buy a multi-family building that is sold. Baker said in his letter that this would significantly delay the sale of multi-family homes in Massachusetts “and potentially chill the production of new housing when we desperately need to produce more.”

Baker also vetoed a provision to seal records in eviction cases. Baker said he recognizes that keeping eviction files public makes it harder for tenants to find new housing. But he said the provision would have allowed for the sealing of not only no-fault eviction cases, but also cases where a tenant endangers others or engages in criminal activity. “Keeping this kind of information sealed is unfair to landlords and creates unnecessary risks for other tenants,” Baker wrote.

Baker vetoed a new tax credit for job creation in rural areas. He said the program, as written, was more likely to benefit corporate investors than rural communities and did not tailor the tax credits narrowly enough to the rural communities that most need them.

He vetoed a commission to look at public contracting opportunities for minority– and women-owned businesses, arguing that it is unnecessary in light of a separate bill Baker is filing on the topic.

Baker did sign a provision that would let hoteliers and municipalities create Tourism Destination Marketing Districts, where hotels in the district would charge guests a fee and use the money to market the region.

Baker signed into law a 15 percent cap on the fees that food delivery apps like GrubHub and Uber Eats can charge restaurants during the COVID-19 emergency.

He signed a provision that will create the state’s first licensing system for student loan servicers, along with a state ombudsman to address complaints involving student loans.


About Allied Bolt & Screw
Allied Bolt and Screw Corporation, a Small Business incorporated in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts by Richard ‘Dick’ Goldberg, has been building strong relationships since 1961 with an expansive quality inventory, exceptional service and highly valued customer appreciation. Allied stocks the largest selection of  fasteners and 1000s of other products. Contact Us for more information.


 

Construction News: What's in the new COVID-19 relief package for contractors?

Reprinted from  Construction Dive

The term “construction” appears 636 times in the $908 billion pandemic relief package and $1.4 trillion omnibus spending bill passed by Congress at the end of December.

In other words, while the relief package was less than half the size of the initial $2.2 trillion Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act, there’s still plenty in the overall bill for contractors to be happy about.

“Lots of construction spending is always a good thing, as long as everyone has access to it,” said Kristen Swearingen, vice president of legislative and political affairs at Associated Builders and Contractors. Her cautionary tone refers to the Protecting the Right to Organize Act, which many nonunion contractors oppose, potentially being passed in the 117th Congress after Democrats regained control of the Senate this week.

But in general, construction advocates said the new pandemic relief package should be viewed as a win.

“This bill for the construction industry has a lot of good things overall,” said Jimmy Christianson, vice president of government relations at the Associated General Contractors of America. “I would say on the list of the many things we were asking for, we got probably 80%.”

Nevertheless, one lament is that the package doesn’t include liability protection for employers against lawsuits from employees who were exposed to or became infected with COVID-19 at work.

With the caveat that legislative analysts and construction observers still are digesting the 5,593-page document, here’s a closer look at some of the provisions that should help contractors in 2021:

Paycheck Protection Program. There are several wins for contractors in the the legislation’s renewed PPP funding, including a provision to ensure expenses paid for with forgiven PPP loans are tax deductible, an issue many contractors were wringing their hands over last fall.

A related benefit is the expansion of the Employee Retention Tax Credit, which gives qualifying employers a $5,000 credit per worker for employees not paid with PPP funds in 2020, as well as a $7,000 credit per worker per quarter in the first half of 2021.

“That’s a huge deal for construction companies and employees to help manage the continuing uncertainty that’s still happening,” said Christianson.

State transportation funding. One of the headline numbers for contractors is the $10 billion earmarked for state DOTs, many of which saw their funding decline in 2020. That should provide relief for road and other civil builders who have increasingly felt the impacts of stalled projects.

“It will help mitigate the impact of bid-letting delays and project cancellations that we saw in 2020 throughout the country,” Christianson said. “And the fact that it’s dedicated funding means that states can’t use it for other things.”

School construction. The package also includes $82 billion for education, at least some of which can be used for construction and renovations post-COVID-19, when students return en masse to classrooms.

“In the more significant construction category, we’re looking at HVAC replacement and expansion,” Christianson said. “You might see bigger classrooms to have more spacing between kids, more classrooms and auxiliary facilities being set up to deal with social distancing issues.”

Waterfront infrastructure construction. The $10 billion Water Resources Development Act, which was included in the package, authorizes federal funding for infrastructure projects to improve America’s ports, harbors and inland waterways, and will be implemented via the U.S. Army Corp of Engineers.

“It helps ports expand their operations and helps with harbor maintenance and dredging, as well as construction in and around ports,” Christianson said. “I think the dredgers are excited.”

Broadband infrastructure. The legislation contains $7 billion dedicated to expanding broadband internet infrastructure and access, particularly to rural communities. About $3.3 billion of that is earmarked for programs “that are actually turning dirt,” Christianson said. “So that’s a good opportunity for utility contractors.”

Clean energy. The deal also includes approximately $35 billion to fund wind, solar and other clean energy projects, according to The New York Times, an area that an increasing number of contractors are focusing on. AECOM, Fluor and Jacobs all mentioned environmental initiatives or expanded practices on recent earnings calls, as well as increased interest from clients. Christianson said market forces have led to a heightened focus on environmental projects recently.

“A lot of our members do utility-scale solar, and this legislation brings a lot more certainty to the renewable energy market that we’ve been hoping for,” Christianson said. “You’re also seeing an interest from owners, public and private, who want to do their part on environmentally conscious construction, as well as from the shareholders of these companies.”

Military housing. The National Defense Authorization Act, which was passed last week after Congress overrode President Trump’s veto, includes approximately $11.8 billion for military construction, military family housing and work associated with base realignment and closure rounds. “A lot of our members are active in building military family housing,” Swearingen said.

Tax credits and other incentives. Finally, the pandemic relief plan includes a five-year extension of the $25 billion New Markets Tax Credit, which incentivizes community development and economic growth through the use of tax credits that attract private investment to distressed communities.

It also further expands the Low-Income Housing Tax Credit, as well as the 179D Energy Efficiency Tax Deduction, which allows owners of new or existing buildings to deduct $1.80 per square foot for energy-efficient components or improvements.

“There are a lot of good incentives in here for public and private construction,” Christianson said.

 

 

Reprinted from  ENR

Trade union leaders, construction executives and international health care experts are teaming up in Boston to stop the spread of COVID-19 in the city’s booming construction sector.

Trade union leaders, construction executives and international health care experts are teaming up in Boston to stop the spread of COVID-19 in the city’s booming construction sector. The coalition unveiled a program called Construction Stops COVID on Dec. 22. The testing, tracing and treatment initiative targets tens of thousands of hard-hatted workers toiling on construction sites across the city.

The group includes Greater Building Trades Unions, contractors Suffolk, Turner Construction and John Moriarty & Associates, or JMA, as well as the renowned, international health care organization, Partners in Health, and Harbor Health Services, a local provider.

The program plans to roll out three “mini clinics” for testing and tracing before the end of the year for use by as many as 40,000 Boston-area construction workers.

For ENR’s latest coverage of the impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic, click here

One clinic is slated to take shape in the North Station area, best known as home to the TD Garden; a second clinic near the waterfront/Seaport District; and a third in Kendall Square in Cambridge, a hub for lab and office construction. Millions of square feet in new commercial, research and office space are under construction in those three hotspots.

“All of the industry is really rallying around,” said Brian Doherty, the general agent of the Greater Boston Building Trades Unions. “I have seen amazing collaboration.”

The testing sites will include two drive-thru-only operations and one that will also provide testing to walk-ins.

The three centers will also do contract tracing, such as zeroing in potential outbreaks on construction sites after a positive test result. In addition, the mini clinics, or “hubs,” will also help connect construction workers with health care services, such as helping those without primary care doctors to find one.

In conjunction with the rollout of the testing centers, the coalition also plans to launch a public education campaign focused on the local construction industry. Using texts, emails and targeted messages on social media and posters at worksites, the coalition of industry leaders and health care experts hopes to emphasize best practices, including  mask wearing, social distancing, hand washing and staying home while awaiting test results.

JMA, Suffolk and Turner, as well as local trades unions, have committed hundreds of thousands of dollars toward the effort, with plans to raise additional money through a nonprofit that will operate under the Construction Stops COVID banner.

The program’s Dec. 22 unveiling came the same day Gov. Charlie Baker announced he would impose new COVID-19 restrictions for a minimum of two weeks starting the day after Christmas—including lowering capacity at most businesses to 25% and limiting indoor and outdoor gatherings. Dec. 22 also saw 3,293 newly confirmed coronavirus cases in Massachusetts for a total of 318,143 cases. The death toll from confirmed cases increased by 43 to 11,549.

Union and industry leaders laid the groundwork for the construction-centric effort weeks ago as coronavirus cases surged following the Thanksgiving holiday—and as testing centers in Massachusetts set up by state officials began to get overwhelmed.

“It became apparent in the past four or five weeks that further efforts needed to be done to support this initiative,” said Chris Brown, CEO of John Moriarty and Associates. “We realized we needed additional support and resources to combat this surge.”

The effort won a strong endorsement from Boston Mayor Marty Walsh, who rose from construction worker to head of the city’s largest building trades union before he was elected mayor in 2013.

Walsh made news in March when he became the first big city mayor in the country to shut down construction as the coronavirus epidemic began to take off.

Construction later resumed, but not until after officials in Boston had put into place extensive coronavirus safety rules and protocols for construction sites, with each site required to submit a plan for preventing the spread of the virus.

“This is a historic initiative and the first of its kind in the United States of America,” Walsh said during the rollout of the new mini clinic initiative over a Zoom call. “We are setting the highest safety standards in the country.”

“Our building and construction industry will be key to our long-term recovery,” Walsh said.

Walsh also played a key role in connecting the various partners in the coalition, including introducing construction and trade union leaders with Partners in Health, known for its efforts combatting a range of pandemics, including Ebola, noted Doherty of the Greater Boston Building Trades Unions.

Partners in Health is helping craft the public education campaign and other parts of the effort. Harbor Health will staff the clinics.

“It’s not just about hiding from the virus,” said Dr. Margaret Bourdeaux, research director of Harvard Medical School’s Program in Global Public Policy. “We can put into place systems where people can go back to work and live their lives while we control the virus. Not only can we stay vigilant, but we can go on offense against the virus.”

 

Product Spotlight: LEFT-HAND THREADED BOLTS

Allied Bolt and Screw Corporation is well-known around the country for not only our diverse inventory of standard fasteners, but also our vast inventory of ‘SPECIALS’ as well, such as LEFT-HAND THREADED BOLTS!

Allied Bolt and Screw Corporation now carries a full line of Left-Hand Threaded Hex Tap Bolts which are Grade 8, Fully Threaded and Plain Steel.

Left-handed threads are also known as reverse threads. These threads are used in specialized applications in which the application of pressure would force a right-handed screw or bolt to come loose.

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About Allied Bolt & Screw

Allied Bolt and Screw Corporation, a Small Business incorporated in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts by Richard ‘Dick’ Goldberg, has been building strong relationships since 1961 with an expansive quality inventory, exceptional service and highly valued customer appreciation. Allied stocks the largest selection of  Left-Hand Threaded Bolts and thousands of other products. Contact Us for more information.


 

Happy Holidays from your friends at Allied Bolt & Screw!!

Neil Goldberg gets totally out of the box–to deliver a different yet fun holiday message for 2020. Enjoy!

Video- ‘AUTOMOTIVE-SPECIFIC’ REPAIR ASSORTMENTS

Designed specifically for the repair and restoration of: HYUNDAI, GM, FORD, CHRYSLER, TOYOTA, NISSAN, HONDA, MERCEDES, SUBARU & BMW.

Automotive Assortments, Retainers, Clips, Grommets, Rivets, Screws, Nuts and Washers

Buy Now »


Also, don’t forget to check out our MONTHLY SUPER DEALS designed just for you!!.


Allied Bolt and Screw Corporation, a Small Business incorporated in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts by Richard ‘Dick’ Goldberg, has been building strong relationships since 1961 with an expansive quality inventory, exceptional service and highly valued customer appreciation. Allied stocks ‘AUTOMOTIVE-SPECIFIC’ REPAIR ASSORTMENTS and thousands other products. Contact Us for more information.