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Allied Bolt and Screw carries one of the largest and most diversified lines of Threaded Rods and Threaded Studs in the industry, including A307 Zinc Plated both coarse thread and fine thread, A307 Hot Galvanized, Stainless Steel, Brass, Structural F1554 Grade 55 both Plain Steel and Hot Galvanized up to 2” diameter in 6 foot and 12 foot lengths, F1554 Grade 105 Hot Galvanized 6 foot lengths and 6 foot B7 Threaded Rod both Plain Steel and Hot Galvanized.

We also have Full Thread Studs, Double End Studs and Single End Studs manufactured in all materials.

What you may not know … we can also cut our Threaded Rods to your specific lengths … in-house!

 

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About Allied Bolt & Screw

Since 1961 we have been the top provider of Threaded Rods and Threaded Studs and 1000s of products. Allied Bolt & Screw can fulfill any building and manufacturing need. Contact Us for more information.


 

Construction News: What’s keeping contractors up at night?

Reprinted from Construction Drive

Supply chain chaos and an impending recession are among builders’ top concerns in 2023, according to a new survey.

Builders are bullish on infrastructure work this year thanks to federal funding, but expect supply chain snarls and hiring difficulties to persist, according to Associated General Contractors of America’s 2023 Construction Outlook National Survey.

COVID-19 continues to impact the industry, hitting supply chains in particular. That’s the top concern for builders in the survey, as the uncertainty has caused a variety of negative ripple effects that ultimately mean higher costs and lower profits. As inflation and the specter of a recession continue to loom, contractors are feeling less confident about private sector work.

Builders have reason to be worried: last year 36% of respondents had projects canceled or postponed but not rescheduled. The main reason given, for about half the projects, was rising costs. The association received 1,032 responses overall, primarily from general contractors.

Although contractors are optimistic overall, that doesn’t mean there aren’t rocky times ahead, said AGC Chief Economist Ken Simonson in a webinar last week about the survey.

“Even when we’ve had recessions or slow growth expectations for the economy, contractors are by nature optimists,” Simonson said. “But it is notable that in nearly all of these categories, particularly on the private side, contractors have lower net positive readings or deeper negative readings than they did in previous years.”

Here are some other takeaways from the survey:

Supply chains are still broken

Contractors’ biggest concern for the coming year is the supply chain. The ongoing issues cause project delays, time-consuming logistical headaches and price hikes for materials.

“Supply chain issues and material cost issues will continue, and will continue to have profound effects on schedules and affordability of new projects,” said Mac Caddell, president of Caddell Construction headquartered in Montgomery, Alabama, during the webinar.

To cope in 2022, 70% of respondents accelerated purchases after winning contracts, about half turned to alternative suppliers or used alternative materials or products and 22% stockpiled items before winning contracts.

Hiring will only get harder

Workforce shortages make projects take longer and cost more, and look set to worsen in 2023. In the coming year, 69% of contractors expect to hire and only 11% expect to reduce their headcount, according to the survey. To entice workers, last year 72% increased base pay rates more than in 2021 and about a third boosted bonuses and benefits.

Despite those efforts, 80% are currently having difficulty finding workers and a majority of respondents expect those difficulties to persist. Plus, 83% of contractors worry the shortage and resulting inexperienced skilled labor pool will pose a challenge to the safety and health of their firm’s workers — the biggest threat respondents identified by far.

Cultivating new workers will take time and effort, according to Pittsford, Vermont-based Casella Construction co-founder John Casella.

“I think a lot of the easy levers have been pulled from a wage and a benefits standpoint, and now we’re really needing to look at all the things that no one’s talking about, with demographics and culture and what our jobs look like,” Casella said during the webinar.

Infrastructure a bright spot

While the outlook is more dim for private jobs, contractors are optimistic about infrastructure and other public work, the survey shows. That optimism is widespread even though only 5% of respondents are working on new projects funded by the infrastructure act, while 6% have won bids but have not started work. Another 5% have bid on IIJA projects but haven’t won awards yet, while 21% said they plan to bid on projects but nothing suitable has been offered so far.

Overall, contractors expect the value of infrastructure projects to rise, and for lodging, office and retail to slump in 2023.
Courtesy of AGC

AGC CEO Stephen Sandherr warned the IIJA’s Buy America and labor stipulations are still unclear, and said that will make it harder for state and local jurisdictions to advance these projects.

“Federal officials need to deliver on the promise of these substantial new investments in infrastructure and construction,” Sandherr said. “To do that, they will need to address much of the regulatory and permitting uncertainty that muted the hoped-for benefits of the bipartisan infrastructure law in 2022.”

Product Spotlight: HOT GALVANIZED ANCHOR BOLTS

Foundation anchor bolts are used in the building, construction, and repair of wood and metal structures, such as building columns, posts, street lighting, traffic signals, highway signs, porch and deck supports and much more in concrete and footings.

We stock over 5,000 in over 50 sizes of Hot Galvanized Anchor Bolts (A36).

We’re also BIG on F1554 Grades 36, 55 and 105 in both plain steel and hot galvanized as ‘special orders’.

Click here for stock sizes and pricing.


About Allied Bolt & Screw

Since 1961 we have been the top provider of Hot Galvanized Anchor Bolts, Rods, Studs, Nuts, Washers, screws and 1000s of products. Allied Bolt & Screw can fulfill any building and manufacturing need. Contact Us for more information.


 

How to Attract and Retain a Traveling Construction Team During a Labor Shortage

Reprinted from ForConstructionPros.com

As these slim teams are needed for extended, out-of-town trips to worksites in other areas, it’s critical that their accommodations ensure their comfort and rest between shifts. Doing so ultimately keeps the entire team employed, safe, and productive.

The U.S. construction industry has been battling a variety of challenges for some time, including supply chain disruptions, rising material costs, high interest rates and a severe labor shortage.

Regarding the latter, the severe labor shortage, there are a few contributing factors: COVID-19, the great resignation, and an aging workforce – one-fifth of construction workers are older than 55. This means leadership relies heavily on current team members, many of whom are likely working long hours to get projects done.

As these slim teams are needed for extended, out-of-town trips to worksites in other areas, it’s critical that their accommodations ensure their comfort and rest between shifts. Doing so ultimately keeps the entire team employed, safe, and productive on the job.

Coupled with rising, inflation-impacted hotel, airfare, and rental car rates adds another layer of complexity to the construction travel manager’s role. Plus, many traveling workers have become accustomed to having their own accommodations rather than sharing a room, a practice that took off during the pandemic and is now an expectation companies may need to provide, despite higher costs.

Let’s dive into some labor-related challenges, planning strategies, and technology that construction industry leadership and travel managers can leverage to best support their teams. This includes exploring accommodations they need without breaking their budgets.

Pandemic Prompted More Spend On Homes, But The Construction Industry Can’t Keep Up

Construction employment in the United States has experienced nominal growth, with the number of workers inching up an average 2.1% from 2017 to 2022. However, this number falls way short of the spending on new construction, which is expected to top $2 trillion by 2025, up from $1.6 trillion in 2021.

After initial pandemic lockdowns, people spent more time at home, resulting in a demand for construction projects to upgrade their homes or move to different ones. Coupled with a shortage of inventory, it’s easy to see why there’s a need for more construction workers. The industry was understaffed due to COVID-related layoffs and illnesses, not to mention quitting to find employment in other less-volatile industries.

So, despite slow-but-steady inclines of construction employees, the industry’s employment rates have not kept up with the growth, specifically when it comes to hiring skilled labor. The labor shortage is expected to continue throughout this year – and likely beyond.

This means current construction employees could be working longer-than-normal, labor-intensive hours and possibly putting in shifts seven days a week. When this is the case, they are exhausted and need safe, comfortable accommodations to recharge. Failure to rest often leads to burnout and attrition.

America needs between 650,000 and 1 million more construction workers than it currently has. But since the 2021 median pay for construction workers is $37,520 per year, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, it’s easy to see why attracting and keeping talent is tough.

Aside from increasing pay and incentives, it’s critical for construction industry leadership and travel managers to do what they can to keep the staff they have. Technology can help. It can keep projects on budget, find the closest places to source materials, and can help pinpoint the best and most affordable places for employees to rest.

Tech Solutions Make The Construction World Go ‘Round

With more projects on the horizon than employees to build them, construction industry leaders have turned to tech to support their teams and drive job-site productivity and cost-savings. Such tools could include those that simplify scheduling, bidding and progress, or ones that compare and find the best pricing for lumber, bricks or steel, for instance.

The $1.2 trillion infrastructure bill passed by the Senate in August 2021 includes $100 million over five years to accelerate digital construction technologies’ deployment, like 3D modeling software and digital project management platforms.

But there are other technology platforms to consider. For example, expense management technologies that formerly focused on decreasing the cost of processing expenses have expanded into managing employee spending habits and integrating corporate policies into decisions related to business travel costs.

These are particularly helpful for construction and travel managers in finding the most affordable hotel prices and rental car rates, especially since prices related to travel and dining out have increased because of inflation.

These digital tools can handle traditionally time-intensive tasks like finding nearby hotels with pre-negotiated rates, locating construction workers on the road in case of emergencies, and auditing and reconciling travel expenses.

When you consider the number of hours it takes to manually organize and manage business trip details, from making reservations to reconciling receipts, it’s easy to see why construction companies are investing in solutions to save time, keep increasing business travel costs at bay, and help improve worker satisfaction.

Step Up Your Game To Attract More Talent

McKinsey suggests companies reimagine talent by doing things like accelerating onboarding, boosting retention by delivering benefits that workers want beyond more money, and getting ahead of the game by doing a better job at developing pipelines for future employees.

Construction leaders should consider combing through every avenue that could make construction work more satisfactory to employees, including tech.

Robotics, data management, automation, and augmented reality can help the construction industry increase productivity and efficiency. There are also solutions to make lodging, dining, and transportation to and from sites and accommodations much better.

Since it’s tough to find enough construction workers to complete needed projects, from home-building to office upgrades to improving infrastructure, out-of-town work has become commonplace. Advancements in integrated platform technology enables construction leadership to easily manage communications surrounding the building process.

Respond to Workers’ Out-Of-Town Needs

Although the construction sector’s employment needs are unique in many ways, there’s a similar, underlying theme with other industries: employees want change. They expect to be treated well and want travel managers to understand their need for single, comfortable accommodations, while employers look for affordable solutions amid rising costs. The same goes for transportation and dining options, particularly when working at out-of-town sites.

Listen to employees’ needs. Listen to suppliers’ needs. But the bottom line is, technology cannot solve the labor shortage. But it can improve the construction worker and employer experience, especially when it comes to simplifying and streamlining working far away from home.

SHEET METAL SCREWS from Allied Bolt

A thread forming tapping screw with spaced threads and a gimlet point.

 

Allied Bolt and Screw Corporation, a Small Business incorporated in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts by Richard ‘Dick’ Goldberg, has been building strong relationships since 1961 with an expansive quality inventory, exceptional service and highly valued customer appreciation. Allied stocks  Zinc Plated Pan Head Phillips Sheet Metal Screws and thousands of other products. Contact Us for more information.

Boston Construction News: Delayed Tower Takes Shape Over Boston's South Station The 680-ft-tall structure will be one of the city's tallest buildings

Reprinted from ENR New England

After decades of planning and false starts, a 51-story tower is finally taking shape over Boston’s South Station, set to be one of the city’s tallest buildings.

The tower’s steel frame recently passed the 109-ft mark on its way to an eventual 680 ft, rising above the 604-ft, 33-story Federal Reserve building  across Summer Street. At 60-stories and 790 feet, 200 Clarendon, better known as the John Hancock Tower, is Boston’s tallest building.

Texas-based developer Hines held a groundbreaking ceremony for the $1.5-billion South Station tower earlier this fall, delayed from early 2020 due to COVID-19 restrictions. Set to open by the second quarter of 2025, the 1 million-sq-ft tower includes 166 luxury condos, 670,000 sq ft of office space and 500 parking spaces. Residential units will feature floor to ceiling windows, while the Ritz-Carlton brand will help oversee units and related building amenities, the developer says.

Hines also plans a second building over the tracks at South Station, estimated around 300 ft tall, for which it says it has secured needed approvals. The developer has not disclosed if it will be commercial or residential.

“The market has changed a bit with the uncertainty around getting people back into the office,” said David Perry, Hines senior managing director in charge of New England.

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Allied Bolt & Screw carries full line of Personal protective equipment.

Personal protective equipment refers to protective clothing, helmets, goggles, or other garments or equipment designed to protect the wearer’s body from injury or infection. The hazards addressed by protective equipment include physical, electrical, heat, chemicals, biohazards, and airborne particulate matter.

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Allied Bolt and Screw Corporation, a Small Business incorporated in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts by Richard ‘Dick’ Goldberg, has been building strong relationships since 1961 with an expansive quality inventory, exceptional service and highly valued customer appreciation. Allied stocks 10s of thousands of products including Hard Hats and Masks.  Contact Us for more information.

FORGED HARDWARE

We carry a complete line of FORGED EYE BOLTS, TURNBUCKLES, CLEVISES, SHACKLES, EYE NUTS, and more.

 

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Allied Bolt and Screw Corporation, a Small Business incorporated in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts by Richard ‘Dick’ Goldberg, has been building strong relationships since 1961 with an expansive quality inventory, exceptional service and highly valued customer appreciation. Allied stocks 10s of thousands of products including FORGED EYE BOLTS, TURNBUCKLES, CLEVISES, SHACKLES, EYE NUTS, and moreContact Us for more information.

Allied Bolt & Screw carries a full line of brass machine screws, wood screws, nuts, threaded rods, washers, sink inserts, thumb screws and cotter pins.

Allied Bolt & Screw carries a full line of brass machine screws, wood screws, nuts, threaded rods, washers, sink inserts, thumb screws and cotter pins.

BUY NOW »

Allied Bolt and Screw Corporation, a Small Business incorporated in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts by Richard ‘Dick’ Goldberg, has been building strong relationships since 1961 with an expansive quality inventory, exceptional service and highly valued customer appreciation. Allied stocks 10s of thousands of products including brass machine screws, wood screws, nuts, threaded rods, washers, sink inserts, thumb screws and cotter pinsContact Us for more information.

Boston Construction News: Consigli breaks ground on Lendlease’s $500M Boston life science project

Reprinted from constructiondive.com

Rendering of Forum, Lendlease and Ivanhoé Cambridge’s nine-story, 350,000-squarefoot life science and office development.

Dive Brief:

  • Australian developer Lendlease and Montreal, Canada-based real estate management firm Ivanhoé Cambridge have broken ground on a $500 million life science project in Boston.
  • The two companies joined local officials last week to turn dirt on the Forum, a nine-story, 350,000-square-foot project located in the mixed-use Boston Landing development in the city’s Allston-Brighton neighborhood.
  • Milford, Massachusetts-based Consigli will serve as the project’s general contractor and BR+A Consulting Engineers as project engineer. The project is slated to finish in 2024, according to Lendlease.

Dive Insight:

The project will have 60% of its space dedicated to labs and 40% to office space.

Demand for life science buildings has outpaced supply, as growth in vaccine development contributes to larger trends in the pharmaceutical and biotech industries. While offices have faced high vacancy rates as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic, life science projects, especially in hubs like Boston and San Diego, have not.

But life science projects require more consideration for unique building codes, lots of planning upfront and specialized infrastructure, making them a complex undertaking.

This is the first life science project for the developer team, but likely won’t be the last. Earlier in 2022, Ivanhoé Cambridge announced a separate joint venture with an initial equity investment of $500 million to develop in high-growth life science clusters around the U.S.